What is Black Garlic ?

Allium sativum or garlic, belongs to the onion genus Allium, and is closely related to the onion, rakkyo, chive, leek, and shallot. Fresh garlic has nutritional benefits superior to that of any kind of processing, such as minced and refrigerated, or dried in flakes. But do you know, today garlic can become something so different ? Some people call it black garlic. We are usually surprised to hear that the unique color, taste, and texture of black garlic. But how to make it ? black garlic

Black garlic actually made by “fermenting” whole bulbs of fresh garlic in a humidity-controlled environment in temperatures about 60ºC for around forty days. By fermenting giving black garlic a sweet, mellow flavor and an inky hue. the transformation is due not to microbial metabolism but in part to the Maillard Reaction, a cascade of chemical reactions that produce the dark colour and complex, caramelized flavor and to enzymatic breakdown (the heat denatures alliinase, the enzyme that converts non-volatile alliin into volatile allicin, the compound responsible for fresh garlic’s pungency). Fermented foods help stabilize our intestinal flora. When the intestine is in good shape, it strengthens our immune system. Black Garlic contains approximately 850 mg S-allyl-cysteine (SAC) per bulb, which is 30 times less toxic than allicin in garlic. Black garlic also contains the following crucial nutrients like, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B6 and vitamin C. A person can consume significantly more black garlic with no side effects.

In a study was published in the journal Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Science and Technology in a 2009, black garlic was more effective than fresh garlic in reducing the size of tumors. While most of us are familiar with the white bulbs of garlic commonly used in cooking, you may have yet to come across black garlic. If you’re after a tasty health boost then black garlic, with its higher antioxidant levels and milder flavour, would make a great addition to your diet.